Pet Allergies

  • Permalink Gallery

    Dr. Bassett Contributes to ScienceLine – Are pets good or bad for your child’s allergies?

Dr. Bassett Contributes to ScienceLine – Are pets good or bad for your child’s allergies?

For most of my childhood, my parents were reluctant to adopt whatever barked or meowed. Part of it was because of my dad’s unadmitted phobia of dogs; another part had to do with the fear my pediatrician had struck in my mom. If she wanted to keep me and my sister allergy-free, he told her, then no pets should be allowed in our house. Read More: http://scienceline.org/2018/01/pets-good-bad-childs-allergies/
By |January 31st, 2018|Pet Allergies, ScienceLine|Comments Off on Dr. Bassett Contributes to ScienceLine – Are pets good or bad for your child’s allergies?

Pet Allergies

Pet allergies refer to the body’s allergic reaction to animal proteins that may be present in the saliva, skin cells or urine. In most cases, this kind of allergy is triggered by exposure to pet dander. Generally, any animal with fur like dogs, horses, cats and rodents can cause an allergic reaction. There are several treatments available, including immunotherapy (allergy shots or drops)  to help those who are pet allergic live happily with their pets. Symptoms of pet allergies Pet allergies present several symptoms that include the following: Runny nose Sneezing Itchy, watery or […]
  • Permalink Gallery

    Earlier, Longer Allergy Season Coming: Inside The Pollen Tsunami

Earlier, Longer Allergy Season Coming: Inside The Pollen Tsunami

Dr. Cliff Bassett told CBS2’s Cindy Hsu things are changing; allergy seasons are starting weeks earlier and they’re sticking around, “Longer allergy seasons because of climate change and global warming, we know it’s a pollen tsunami.” Watch Dr. Bassett on CBS New York:

What is an allergist?

An allergist refers to a doctor that specializes in the evaluation, diagnosis, treatment as well as management of asthma and other disorders that are related to the immune system. To be an allergist, one must go through years of academic and professional training. That is, four years in college, four years in medical school, three years of residency training in pediatrics or internal medicine as well as a two to three year fellowship in pediatric and adult allergy and immunology. They must conclude with passing a difficult exam before they […]
  • Permalink Gallery

    Dr Bassett Recommends Pet Allergy Relief Strategies on CNN News Report

Dr Bassett Recommends Pet Allergy Relief Strategies on CNN News Report

Allergies: For love of pets, and their owners by Elizabeth Landau, CNN In a new report by Elizabeth Landau of CNN, Dr Clifford Bassett recommends some allergy relief strtaegies for allegic pet owners. Here is an excerpt: Allergists such as Dr. Clifford Bassett, director of Allergy & Asthma Care of New York and ACAAI fellow, understand the plight of the allergic pet-lover. There are several lifestyle modifications that can provide some relief, he said. Bassett recommends getting a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate absorption) air filter, which can suck up irritating particles from dogs and cats, […]
By |March 15th, 2014|Allergy News, Allergy Tips, CNN Health, Pet Allergies|Comments Off on Dr Bassett Recommends Pet Allergy Relief Strategies on CNN News Report

Can You Develop Cat Allergy in Adult Life?

Can Cat Allergy Develop in Adult Life? Q. My teenage daughter brought home (and we’ve adopted) a calico cat. I started getting a runny nose and a cough when near it, so I went to an allergist for testing. The results were positive. I don’t get it: our family had cats when I was a child. Can you develop an allergy to cats in your forties? Must we give him away? Dr. Clifford Bassett: Yes, although […]
By |August 13th, 2013|Allergy News, Allergy Tips, Pet Allergies|Comments Off on Can You Develop Cat Allergy in Adult Life?

Dr Bassett On Pet Allergies In Family Circle Magazine

Article in Family Circle by Alison Goldman — “Pet allergies are nothing to sneeze at—an estimated 10% of the U.S. population and up to 30% of people with asthma suffer from them. Despite the less-than-desirable consequences, many still yearn for creature companionship. “I’m very pro-pet,” says Clifford Bassett, MD, allergist and medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of New York. “But if you have a pet and allergies, you need to look for a long-term solution to create a […]
By |June 4th, 2011|Allergy News, Allergy Tips, Pet Allergies|Comments Off on Dr Bassett On Pet Allergies In Family Circle Magazine

Allergies at Your Age?

How can you hit your 30s (or beyond) and only then start reacting to ragweed or cat dander? That’s the question on the minds of more and more grown-ups who are suddenly sneezing right alongside their kids. “If you look in the medical literature, you’ll see an explosion of new cases of allergies, sinus problems and asthma in adults all over the world,” says Clifford Bassett, M.D., an allergist/immunologist with the Long Island College Hospital of Brooklyn. “In my practice, I see mostly children and adolescents who eventually outgrow […]

Keep Allergies At Bay This Holiday Season

While many people report added stress during the holidays, doctors say the season can also uncover hidden allergies that would otherwise go unnoticed. NY1’s Kafi Drexel filed the following report. Dana Conte is allergic to almost everything, including Christmas trees. “My family has a tendency of getting live, real trees and I am in charge of decorations. So last year and I was not thinking, normally I usually put gloves on…didn’t think anything of wear the gloves because it was late at night. Wake up and from my forearm, my elbow straight down to […]

Nothing to sneeze at: The truth about pet and seasonal allergies

You LIVING WELL. As many as 40 million people in the United States suffer from allergies; armed with the following little-known information, your spring and summer could be nearly sniffle-free. There is no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog Allergy specialist Dr. Michael S. Blaiss of the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center insists there are no “best breeds” for people with allergies. “All cats and dogs produce allergenic proteins in their saliva, urine and skin,” he says. “The fur is not a factor in contributing to […]